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20121010
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with qualifications, and then think about the vision from the conservatives. michael goves. he wanted to bring back -- [laughter] okay i get the point. michael, who wanted to bring back the two-tier academic exams. i remember was like. i remember the whole one group of young people. we are not going back to those days. [applause] michael goves who had contempt for vocational qualifications and some of the best vocational qualifications our country has. and michael, who has notng to say about education. so in education there is a choice of two futures. education for the narrow elite with the conservative and one nation still system as part of a one nation economy with the next labor government. [applause] to be a one nation economy, we have to make life just that easier for the producers and that much harder for the producers. i think people know what i'm talking about. [applause] the businesses tell me the pressure for the investors can have their own view. they want to plan one year, two years, ten years ahead but have to publish their accounts every three months in line with the wishes of the bes
presentation will be michael from "time" magazine to give the land scape in politics and what's happening. i'll run through a little -- some of the questions that i think we might m to be asking, the beyond sticker shock questions, do that quickly, and then we'll -- and then we'll be joined by trevor potter, katherine -- trevor potter, a partner in captain and drive, and dale. we know him for years, but now the world knows him, and katherine maggie ward is a fellow here at new america and editing manager of "reason" magazine. in addition to moderating, she can provide provocation which is useful. with no further adieu, thank you, all, for coming, and i'll tern it over to michael. >> i wonder who knew trevor when he was a lawyer for john mccain, an important job, nothing like being a lawyer for steven cobehr. maybe one day i can work for comedy central and people can be impressed. a brief overview. this is a graphic we ran in "time" at the end of july this summer trying the best at that moment in time to project out where the money was comes from and what the difference would be in terms of v
these contributions continue for years to come. i will stop here and allow michael to give you more details. thank you for your support of america's aviation system and keeping this economic engine running at full throttle. >> administrator? >> good morning jarman mica, chairman petrie, ranking member costello and members of the committee. as you heard from deputy secretary porcari, nextgen is happening now. it's not something we are doing alone. it's a public-private partnership that will enhance the safety of our aviation system and lay the groundwork for the united states to continue to operate the safest aviation system in the world. i needed a pre-ready to step up our collaboration with our stakeholders externally to increase the focus on nextgen and to bring benefits to the travelling public now. the faa has a long history of engaging with industry to develop consensus are not policy, programs and regulatory decisions. we have worked closely with our industry partners such as rtca and have incorporated important advice from that organization in our nextgen planning. we also established a broad b
immediate right is michael howe who's the technical cofounder of the fourth of state project as well as the architect of the platform that runs both enterprises. the project focuses on driving media coverage of the election 2012. and i think he'll have a very interesting powerpoint presentation to make to us. to my immediate left is amy davidson, senior editor at the new yorker. she's been at the magazine since 1995, writes a blog and contributes to the magazine's pages. next is anna sale who's a political reporter for wnyc radio politics site, it's a free country.org. she covered the gop primaries, my condolences -- [laughter] and focuses on swing states far away from political rallies. sounds like a much better assignment. [laughter] she appears on the takeaway and contributed to npr, bbc, wgvh, new york 1 and pbs. next to her is greg marx who's a staff writer for the columbia journalism review, co-editor of cjr's swing state project. he was a writer for remapping debate.org, and if you've seen his writings, which i have fold over the last few week -- followed over the last few wee
. maybe 15 years ago by michael mori interviewed in "60 minutes." this is a remarkable show available online. michael wallis pointed finger at him and said your dick tater. he said several times. he laughed and he said oh, well. but chinese, that's a shame. how could you not react? after many years people so his approach actually was -- actually make michael wallis seemed embarrassed. you do same thing with pushing king and wen jiabao. they will react first on. so we do need to know this kind of mindset, this experience. so that's why harry kissinger, you said early on it so important, defining moment, look for the previous expense, really shape their behavior. there's a tremendous plume of cooperation. spent dr. kissinger, i think he said expressed in the cultural revolution hardened this generation of leaders. how does that merit out and how they view both domestic policies in china and the relationship to the world? or is that not really a key factor of how they see their role? >> we cannot really know yet how they will conduct themselves in foreign policy, because they are not yet
deliberately chose michael carr as one of the scientists to interview for my book was he retired -- because he retired right after he was at jpl. so to see that kind of transition. >> uh-huh. let's talk about the dangers of anthroto moretizing our rovers as we put them up there. i was following the tweets of the martian -- of curiosity, and ask sometimes they bridged into the adult. and it was great fun, it was wonderful, but as soon as you start injecting that humanity, you -- a lot of people get in trouble on twitter. [laughter] i was wondering about how much of a burden it is to say, oh, now this is as much our mascot as it is our scientist. >> well, i think that is the truth. and that was probably my biggest surprise in going through my work over these eight years, because i did start, as i said, rather upset when i first saw that 2001 press release. i was at hart and rater in july when it came out, and i remember ranting and raving to anyone who would listen to me who is this steve squires, and why is he saying these on sudden things? robot wick geologists, we're in -- robotic geologists,
if you've watched the interview. this is 15 years ago and 60 minutes michael wallace points his finger he wore a dictator. he says it several times. they say how could you not react? but now people saw his approach was very smart and would make michael wallace embarrassed. if you do the same i think would be disaster. they would act very strongly. so we do need to know this mind set, this kind of experience. so that is why henry kissinger said early on this so important to look at the defining moment and shape their view of their behavior for cooperation. >> at the g7 during the cultural revolution of heart in this generation of leaders. how does that bear out in how they view both domestic policies in china and the relationship to the world or is that not the key factor between how they see the role cox >> they cannot know yet because they are not yet in office. there have been instances they've made a very sharp response to that i've had several conversations with an extraordinarily subtle person raised a number of philosophical questions. if you look at the appointment it stated in the
. >> evan thomas on ikes bluff. new york city mayor michael bloomberg and news corporation executive rupert murdoch recently traveled to boston to give advice to the romney campaign about immigration policy. mayor bloomberg has a more of an earlier that day in chicago to advise the obama campaign. up next, the boston event with the two cochairs of the group partnership for a new american economy which supports immigration change as an economic issue. wall street journal executive jarosite moderates the discussion. you will hear from boston mayor thomas bonino. this is about an hour. [applause] >> so the council, needless to say, is very pleased to host a very special discussion on one of the most vexing issues of public policy facing our nation. how to develop and implement there, sensible, and forcible immigration policy. it is a topic that often is addressed with more heat than like. the partnership for a new american economy is working to change that tendency and to promote serious, intelligent, rational, and respectful engagement of that complex issue . we are especially honored to have
. you thought michael bloomberg was. no, it's david koch. but he funds the metropolitan opera, big supporter of it. the metropolitan museum of art, cancer research centers around the country. but most of their money goes into political activities, and they are everywhere. the heritage foundation in washington, d.c., koch brothers. the cato institute when it started, koch brothers. some of you may know now the koch brothers -- cato kind of went its own independent way, and the koch brothers are now suing the cato institute to get it back to be a totally controlled koch brothers' operation. people, americans for prosperity, the most active political organization today, all funded by the koch brothers. freedomworks, dick armey's organization, koch brothers. john kasich in ohio, koch brothers' candidate. bought lock, stock and barrel by the koch brothers. same with scott walker in wisconsin. everywhere. in california a couple of years ago there was a measure, prop 23 on the ballot, to repeal the clean, new clean car standards put in by arnold schwarzenegger. that measure to repeal thos
care bill. that is, to me, where the two sets completely flipped. fahrenheit 911, michael more interviews john conyers and says, sit down. everyone was up in arms. the rallying cry against the health care bill was about reading the bill and that it was too long. all these ideas. and so what i hope is that we can be beyond some of that and that politics is always going to have some element of political procedural accusations that a back-and-forth, but i think that if you look broadly enough over time there is such a thing as progress on legislative process issues. if you go far enough back there are things that are clearly worse than we have gotten better at. and over time the goal is to elevate substance and merit and they're is a lot of tricky questions about representation of political power that are somewhat intractable but that over time we are making something that works better the results in having people feel powerless and frustrated a little bit less often, and that, to me, is what the goal should be. and then even more specifically to now i think one reason this burke
's been extraordinary this cycle. i think really impress. what michael has been doing. what michel's successor at "mother jones" has been doing. i think the story in the times has been doing an amazing coach. but the 501(c)(4) story, it's kind of unprecedented and this is not, i've worked for a lot of nonprofit. i've worked for foundation. 501(c)(4)'s are supposed to be, nonprofit and they will allow a little bit. they are not intended to be used as political vehicles. that's not supposed to their primary purpose. and the agency is prepared, the irs is not prepared to submit deal with this thing that is in their nonprofits on which is not really what they're supposed to be doing. that's the biggest thing that happened, it's just a direct violation of what the intent of -- not the campaign finance law by the textile of what 501(c)(4)'s were supposed to be. spent i think it really is complicated. i had an interviewer reporting to me how i start talking a 501(c)(4) in the start menu set my personal goal is never to mention the phrase 501(c)(4) in my article. that's why stephen colbert
michael moore, nancy pelosi. think your local college professor. you know, think the driver of the crazy car with all of the bush is hitler bumper stickers on the back of the car. think the gender studies wearing the head band at your local whole foods store. you get the picture; right? they no , nominate professions leaving a cultural imprint, cultures like journal ism, arts, academia, and america's fastest band of intertapers, circumstance day sew lay success bats. who are these people who call themselves liberals? how does such a small group impact our lives? what motivates them? i'm in an excellent position to answer the deep questions because i've been watching liberals closely for over 30 years, studied liberals like jane goodall studies her chimps. [laughter] in their natural habitats and without judgment, in silence mostly because we barely speak the same language. i've been tireless in research. i lived with liberals, broke bread with them, humored them, teased them, prodded them, and, yes, even loved some of them, some my friends, and some members of my own family. my commitme
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12